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    • CommentAuthorTRMichels
    • CommentTimeAug 4th 2010 edited
     

    First, lets look at the brown bear from last year, and the brown bear from this year. Because this year's bear is bigger, they could be the same bear, in fact, statistically speaking, there is a good likelyhood that it is, because bears establish home ranges, that they generally stay in, after they reach 3-5 years of age. Last years bear (on top) looks to me like a 3.5 year old, not lanky like a 2.5 year old. This year's bear looks like a 4.5 year old, because it has really stated to fill out.

    The coloration of the two is almost an exact match, brown, not cinnamon. It could be the same bear.   

     

      BrownBlackBear110.jpg
      BrownBlackBearBoar.jpg
    • CommentAuthorTRMichels
    • CommentTimeAug 4th 2010 edited
     

    I'm not sure what the problem is above, but this is the text that is actually there, you just cant see it.

    Now, to compare female American Black Bear heads to male heads. Look closely at the two heads in the photo of Whiskers mating with Dark Nose. His head appears to be more massive, broader through the cheeks and eyes. That is what we should be looking for to determine sex.

     

    The first and fourth photos show Dark Nose the sow having a finer, less massive muzzle. KInd of dainty isn't she?

     

    Now look at the brown bear photo above, and you can see that it clearly has a broad, massive head, suggestive of a boar. That, coupled with the size of the brown bear's body, suggests to me that it is a boar.

    • CommentAuthorTRMichels
    • CommentTimeAug 5th 2010 edited
     

    Here is the tall, wide 8 pt buck I saw last night at LF. I think he will score at least 130, probably 140 due to his great height and width.

      WidetTall8PtbuckLF249.jpg
      WideTall8ptBuckLF250.jpg
    • CommentAuthorTRMichels
    • CommentTimeAug 5th 2010
     

    Let's hope we can get another photo of "Fred the brown Black Bear boar", to put up on the forum. I'd like to see him on all fours, and then standing up. I'm depending on on you ladies, especially oknad, to get the photo. 

    God bless,

    T.R.

    • CommentAuthorTRMichels
    • CommentTimeAug 22nd 2010
     

    Sicne Archery season dods n ot begin until October, any incres in nocturnal bear activiyt is not a result of hunting. I'm guessing increased nocturnal bear activity is a result of Hypperphagia, and since high temperatures do not seem to inhibit bear activity, high temps are not a factor in noctrunal activity -  which leaves us with hyperphagia. Obviously if they are already moving at all hours of the day, the only way the bears can increase the hours per day the are active, is by utilizing the nocturnal hours. 

    This is an aspect of bear behavior that has not been looked at before. What we are doing here is not only informative, is is important.

    God bless

    T.R.

    • CommentAuthoreiguoc
    • CommentTimeAug 25th 2010
     

    TR. Can you please tell me the ages of the 2 different fawns I have in Eigouc;s photos Part 5. The 2 taken on the 22 I can tell are younger & the single on the 24 is older, but no clue as to age. Thanks, Hope you're feeling better

    • CommentAuthorTRMichels
    • CommentTimeAug 26th 2010
     

     I would say this bear I see on 8/26/10 is definitely in hyperphagia. If a baer eats corn for an hour, they must eat berries, forbs (wildflowers), grasses and insects a lot longer before they fill up. Eating corn at a feeder like this, probably cuts down on the amount of time per day a bear eats in hyperphagia, which may be up to 20 hours per day.

    We are definitely seeing nocturnal activity already, whereas last month most activity was during the day.

      Unknown8-26-10DM262.jpg
    • CommentAuthoreiguoc
    • CommentTimeAug 26th 2010
     

    Thank you TR. I added the ages to my pic file

    • CommentAuthorTRMichels
    • CommentTimeAug 26th 2010
     

    I've been thinking about corn feeders. If the habit for large boars is to patrol their home range, and their home range may be 10 miles square or even larger, we might not see them very often. But, if they begin using the feeders as a primary food source, it  may cause them to restrict their activity, and not patrol their home ranges. What could be the consequences of this? Possible breakdown in normal social heirarchy? Or it could lead to smaller home ranges, thus allowing for more older boars in a smaller area.

    • CommentAuthoreiguoc
    • CommentTimeAug 27th 2010
     

    Tr, Arie, Hubby, just mentioned whiskers aren't under chin, HMM, I still think it's a good name. It sounds better then beardie. I looked through last years pics. Big Ben had "whiskers." Could it be a male & female thing? I have a sow pic from FR July 1/09. Woundering why some bears have "beards" & some don't. Something else for me to look up

    • CommentAuthorTRMichels
    • CommentTimeSep 3rd 2010
     

    Nope - whiskers are not under the chin, mainly under the jaw or slightly behind it. They are similar to the mane of and African lion, or even extensive hair on male tigers. So, we would have to change his name to "Mane". It certainly could be a sex-linked trait. A study of males and females would easily reveal it. Lets hope he sticks around for a few years, so we can  watch him develop intp a real bruiser.

    Arkansas bears may reach 800 pounds. I suspect this is because they are genetically not southern bears, but northern bears, where the forage season is shorter. However, Bergman's Law states that the farrther north you go, the larger the subpecies within a species will be, because it is easier for a larger animal to retain heat in the winter than a smaller animal. If you add that to a  longer growing season in Arkansas for these Minnesota/Manitoba bears, it gives them a chance to put on more weight before they hibernate - hence larger (fatter) bears.  Normally these bears would all be hibernationg by mid-Octobrer, and not come out until late May / early June, when therw is new green forage for them up here. 

    I need to look at  exactly how long they are in hibernation down there, and compare it to here. I think we saw our first bear this spring the last week of April, which is two months earlier than here. And I'm pretty sure we saw bears after mid-November.

    When they den would depend on forage availability and cold weather, so it could vary year to years. Coming out of the den may depend on weather too, but ultimately on forage availability. I suspect they may "learn" by coming out  too early, and possibly not surviving, thus not passing on the tendency to come out too early to their offspring. I don't know if a bear will come out of hibernation, and go back to it's den if there is not enough food. I'll have to ask Lynn.

     

    God bless,

    T.R.  

    • CommentAuthorTRMichels
    • CommentTimeOct 9th 2010
     

    Due to my poor health, with lots of pain and massive doses of narcotics, I'm about 4 months behind on analyzing all of the data, and putting the graphs up. But, I will eventually get to it, and then we can all see how bear and dee ractivity changes as the year progresses, and compare this year's activiyt to last years, to see if there are differences, and then try to figure out why.

     

    Animal research is fascinating, informative, helpfula to game managers and hunters, but it is also a lot of work, very tme consuming, with lots of  supositions, hypothesis - and revisions of hypothesis and conclusions. We have to try to leave preconcieved ideas out of it, and look at the data, to come to any reliable conslusions.   

     

    Many times I ve had to change my idaes, because, although I've never been totaly wrong, I'm often off that makr, even way off the mark. So, I ofen hesitate to make hard and fast statements, until I'm fairly  sure they will hold up.   

     

    May God bless al of you, and keep giving me good data.

     

    T.R. 

    • CommentAuthoreiguoc
    • CommentTimeNov 8th 2010
     

    TR Carolina chickadee pics Oct 11 & 29 TH

    • CommentAuthorTRMichels
    • CommentTimeNov 8th 2010
     

    Pat, where do I find these pictures?

    • CommentAuthoreiguoc
    • CommentTimeNov 21st 2010
     

    TR look under Turkey Hollow Nov 2010 Thread

    • CommentAuthoreiguoc
    • CommentTimeNov 26th 2010
     

    TR . if you pop in. Is weather a factor in when the bucks stop their mating rituals. "canoodling". I read early Dec. on a fewe sites. if it's colder, do they stop sooner

    • CommentAuthorTRMichels
    • CommentTimeNov 28th 2010
     

    Weather does not affect WHEN bucks mate each year, or when they stop mating. It may alter when you see them during the day. One of my axioms is:

     "If is it is too cold, too hot, too windy or too wet, the deer are not going to do what they normally do."  

    Does are giong to be in estrus from mid-October to late January no matter what the weather does, and if the does are in estrus doe, bucks will look for them and breed them if they can.

    T.R.

    • CommentAuthorTRMichels
    • CommentTimeMar 19th 2011
     

    I hope veryone is  ready for bear research - it shoud start any time. And the same can be said for turkeys. If we can hear gobboing, please note it - it will help me determine when peak gobblng and breeding occurs in this area.

    God bless and good researching,

    T.R.  

    • CommentAuthoreiguoc
    • CommentTimeApr 19th 2011 edited
     

    Question here for you TR. ABout Lily & Hope & the outcome of Jason.  Is it normal for a yearling cub of Hopes age to still be nursing . I've heard that she should have stops a few months back

    • CommentAuthorTRMichels
    • CommentTimeApr 19th 2011
     

    Eiguoc.

    It is not normal for a yearling to be nursing, usually they have gone off by themsleves by the time they are that age. And they usualy den by themselves, so it is unlikly they would nurse from the sow.

    • CommentAuthoreiguoc
    • CommentTimeApr 19th 2011 edited
     

    Thanks TR. OK SInce Hope was abandoned by her mom twice, in May 22-May 26, May 31-July 12 - could that be why she was still nursing?

    • CommentAuthorTRMichels
    • CommentTimeApr 20th 2011
     

    I think this is all a very rare occurrence.

    Rarely does a mother abandon a cub, only to take it back again later in the year.

    Rarely does a cub under that age of 6months survive,-only to be reunited with its mother.

    Rarely does a year old bear den with its mother, nonetheless its pregnant mother --- and nurse from it with a new cub.

    Lily is a rare mother, Hope is a rare cub and yearling. We hve been watching bear research history being made.

    And , if you guys will keep taking good notes, we will be makding more bear research discoveriesright here - because no one has ever hda the oportunitey to watch bears in the wild like we have. and no one else hs tekdn the time to  take down the data, examine it and come to  some conclusions.

    Thank you so much Eiguoc, Beverly, Oknad and anyone else observing and taking bear data - you are an invaluable asset to my research.

    We are one of the few groups to see this "sow non-birthing synchronization" - where the sows "do not" give birth to cubs during years of poor forage supply. I'm interested to see if we will see cubs this year,  since we did not see any last year. It all depends on how much forage there was last summer.

    God bless all of you,

     

    T.R.

    • CommentAuthorTRMichels
    • CommentTimeApr 20th 2011
     

    You know - I should have photos of several bears from last year on here some where - including Big Whiskers,- Little Whiskers, Scar, Big Ben etc. Does anyone know what thread they are on?

    • CommentAuthoreiguoc
    • CommentTimeApr 20th 2011 edited
     

    AH TR they are in this one. Page 2

    • CommentAuthorTRMichels
    • CommentTimeJun 11th 2011
     

    Thsi is from my Minneaoplois StarTribune Newspaper Blog.

    It has been a while since I mentioned it, but I am conducting my own Black Bear Research Study through the Wildlife Activity Research Project (WARP). I’m currently in my third year of research into the daily and seasonal behavior of black bears on about a 1000 acre unfenced wildlife preserve in northeast Arkansas, This is all done via six ultra high tech 24 hour per day, 360 degree rotational infra-red (night vision) capable, audio capable cameras, situated on six large corn feeders. I estimate I am studying as many as 25 bears, including 5-6 large boars. Much of the first years research results, and comments on the study, are located at the bottom of the home page of my Trinity Mountain Outdoors website at www.TRMichels.com.

     

    Some of the interesting things we have learned so far are that bears are nowhere near as nocturnal (nighttime active) as previously thought. Through the spring and summer, and part of the fall, they are as active during the day as at night, if not more so. They also are not as inactive as previously thought in high temperatures. I’ve seen big, fat, black, boars, with a luxuriant fur coat, moving around in broad daylight when the temperatures were higher than 90 degrees – on several occasions. If you wnt to learn about theArkansas beafrs, you can log onto www.USeeWildlife.com.

    You can join our "Protect Minnesota’s Research Bears" campaign by logging on to that page on Facebook, and better yet, by sending your comments about why you think the bears should be protected to me at TRMichels@yahoo.com. I’d like to have 1000 letters to present to the State Legislature, DNR Commissioner Landwehr and Governor Mark Dayton before next fall. I only have about 120 now, so if you want to help protect the bears, send me your comments – please.

    Plus you can help my research by participating in the bear research project as one of our volunteer bear reporters. While you learn mainly about the behavior and biology of black bear sows and cubs on the Bear Center web site, you can learn about boars and juveniles on the UseeWildlife web site.

    On a side note, I’ve been asked to be one of the speakers at the Lilypad Picnic, whch is designed to show appreciation for the researchers at the North American Bear Center and the Wildlife Research Institute, and to help protect the bears. The dates are July 22-24, 2011, in Ely, Minnesota. For tickets, lodging availability and other information log on to the Lilypad Picnic 2100 page at http://www.lilypadpicnic.com/index.html. There will be opportunities to tour the center, and take pictures of some of the bears, as well as other fun events. I look forward to seeing you there – in fact if you would like to go, I am offering a bus tour to the event. Contact me at TRMichels@yahoo.com .

     

     

    • CommentAuthorTRMichels
    • CommentTimeJun 11th 2011
     

    One interesting thing we found is that during years when there is poor mast (nut) production from oak, hazel, hickory and other nut bearing trees, the sows (females) may all fail to produce cubs the next spring, even though they were successfully bred and conceived that spring. If the sows are stressed due to a lack of summer/fall forage, then, during the fall and winter/hibernation months, in order to survive, the bodies of the female bears resorb the growing fetus back into their own bodies, so they do not have to provide needed nutrition for themselves, to the fetus. When this occurs the sows may synchronize their birthing sequence, so that none of them give birth the following spring, This may result in all of the sows giving birth to cubs during the same years, as opposed to some sow giving birth during even numbered years and some giving birth in odd numbered years. This occurred in my research area a couple of years ago. With the result that most of the sows now give birth to cubs during the same year.

    Interestingly, these Arkansas bears are all descendants of transplanted bears from Minnesota, Ontario and Saskatchewan (American Black Bears - (Ursus americanus) because the subspecies of bear in Arkansas, the Louisiana Black Bear (Ursus americanus luteolus) was extinct due to overhunting. Since photoperiod (the number of hours of light each day), and temperatures, which are both determined to some extent by latitude, affects when bears emerge from their dens, breed and go into hibernation, one of the things I will looking at is if and how bears from northern latitudes will change their breeding and denning dates due to the higher temperatures and photoperiod. I would expect, over time, that the bears in Arkanss would begin to dome out of their dens earlier if the temperatures are higher than they are her in Minnesota, that they might begin to breed earlier, and the they might go I into their dens later in order to take advantage of the longer growing season of nutritious foods in Arkansas. This might take several generations to occur; only time will tell.

    So far, the boars (which are usually the first to emerge from their dens in the spring, are coming out at about the same time as Dr. Lynn Rogers bears here in Minnesota (about the last week of March or early April) because I keep in touch with him on an almost daily basis. As of yet we have not seen any sows with cubs, but I expect to, unless there was another poor mast crop last year, because we have not seen cubs in two years. We have seen some juvenile bears (ages 1-3 years old) and apparently some sow, because we have noted what we believe is breeding behavior in the last few weeks, just as Dr. Rogers has noted here in Minnesota.

    If you want to watch the deer, bears, turkey, gray fox, armadillos, raccoons, and gray squirrels, as well as trumpeter swans and both bald and golden eagles, and a myriad of bird species at the worlds largest bird feeder (certified); you can do so for free by logging on to www.USeeWildlife.com.

     

    May God bless all of you.

    T.R.